nintendo president tatsumi kimishima

Why is Nintendo Co. Stock Dropping?

I guess the more immediate question is “Why is Dueling Ogres talking about Nintendo Co. stocks?” It’s sure not because I own stock!

But neveryoumind the reason! What I want to talk about is not necessarily stocks, but why Nintendo seems to continue walking that line of not hearing what its public is saying. In order to illustrate that point, I have to get a little economical on you. Make no mistake, I have no idea what I’m talking about when it comes to stocks. All I know is up is good and down is bad, and Nintendo has seen a decline of 2.1% over the past five months, according to Bloomberg.

nintendo mario deathSo what’s the deal? First, the 3DS did well to preserve Nintendo’s margins (see? I’m just saying money words!), but didn’t contribute as much as they had hoped. Second, after diving into the mobile market with Super Mario Run sporting a $10 price tag for the full version, and NOT AVAILABLE FOR ANDROID UNTIL MARCH, it struggled to find ground with only around 3.9 million of its 78 million downloads finding purchase (see what I did there?). While they’re planning on releasing new content and adjusting the difficulty, ultimately it’s unclear that fans will be receptive enough to give the game another go and still decide to actually pay for the app. Also, FREAKING MARCH!!

fire emblemFire Emblem Heroes should be available for iPhone sometime today (coming soon to an Android near you), and with a payment structure that looks far more similar to you regular mobile gaming apps (free with in-game purchase), it’s still tough to say whether or not Nintendo has researched the mobile market enough to save face with other mobile developers and turn a much more consistent profit. Check out this Fire Emblem Heroes article at the Verge for a closer look at the game!

With mobile sales still in flux, Nintendo will fall on the sword with the Switch. There’s really no arguing that the system will be successful to a point, and with another 20+ games being added to the development wall we’re certain to see something for everyone. However, the $300 price tag coupled with Nintendo’s eccentric units-released-in-waves mentality that we talked about in Episode 101: It’s Time to SWITCH to Better Hosts shows that ultimately, they are not listening to their fanbase.

The technology is great. The price is a little high but personally, I think it’s worth it. There’s room for improvement and it seems that software updates will allow those improvements to happen. But why neuter the sales with poorly spaced unit releases? Why drum up the hype so far in advance? Why make your customers wait in pained spasms for the next wave?

Why, Tatsumi-sama, why?!

Ultimately, Nintendo needs to be — and stay with me on this, now — a little less giant lumbering nuclear lizard monster and a little more fleetfoot, graceful Evangelion bio-mechs. Because with the speed at which economies rise and fall, coupled with long game development schedules, Nintendo will only do more reputation damage if it keeps dragging its feet.

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BlackDogSerenade

The gentle sasquatch, known colloquially as "Remington," has been kicking around the rolling hills of West Virginia for hundreds of years. It is uncertain where he came from or where he will eventually end up, but for the time being you can usually find him hunkered behind any restaurant dumpster searching for half-eaten cheeseburgers while humming "What if God was One of Us?"

While he's not reminiscing fondly over his ill-gotten acorn collection, you can also catch him pretending to know anything at all about audio while trying to produce this train wreck they call a podcast in his "studio," which is nothing more than an multidimensional pocket shimmed between the fabric of space-time. That's where sasquatches live, you know.
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Author: BlackDogSerenade

The gentle sasquatch, known colloquially as "Remington," has been kicking around the rolling hills of West Virginia for hundreds of years. It is uncertain where he came from or where he will eventually end up, but for the time being you can usually find him hunkered behind any restaurant dumpster searching for half-eaten cheeseburgers while humming "What if God was One of Us?" While he's not reminiscing fondly over his ill-gotten acorn collection, you can also catch him pretending to know anything at all about audio while trying to produce this train wreck they call a podcast in his "studio," which is nothing more than an multidimensional pocket shimmed between the fabric of space-time. That's where sasquatches live, you know.